Sunday, 9 February 2014

Battered and windswept

When I promised some images of the sea in my last post I didn't have anything quite as wild as this in mind! The south -west coast of England has been taken quite a battering in the last week.

Chesil Beach Portland



Our pictures were taken this morning not at the height of the storm, but as you can see the waves were still huge as they crashed on to the shore. (We didn't go to close!)

Picture by Matthew Gordon

This incredible picture taken off the internet shows just how high the waves reached! Waves and pebbles breached the sea defences and homes were flooded. 



The beach road has been forced to shut at times as it too has flooded. The  Environment Agency were out in force on Sunday repairing the damage and moving the pebbles back again before the next storm appears.


Back in Weymouth the Preston Beach Wall has suffered a similar fate, the popular walk along the top of it was covered with pebbles too.


And in between the storms a moment of calm and beauty - such a contrast!


Further south in Devon, the wonderful railway track at Dawlish that we visited in my post Taking the train to the beach, has also suffered from the storms. Part of the railway was left hanging by a thread (click link to see pictures.) 
Dawlish railway March 2013
This railway line is a vital link to the West Country. South Devon and Cornwall will be without railway until the extensive damage is repaired. This track has suffered a similar fate in the past. In 1869 part of the sea wall and track was also washed away in a violent storm. As always I feel for all of those who are suffering the impact of the storms and whose homes have been damaged.

I hope you all not suffering from the worst of the weather. I saw that Australia is suffering from
extreme heat and bush fires. Let's hope this week coming treat us all more kindly! Thank you for your lovely comments and welcome to my new followers Ann @ StudioHyde, Koma, and Jenny at Tumble weeds.
Sarah x

61 comments:

  1. Good to see those photos. It has been terrible for everyone along the coast, and just as bad for all those living near rivers. If this isn't a sign of the damage we are doing to our wonderful planet Earth, then I don't know what is.

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    1. I agree and also a lack of spending money in protection. Sarah x

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  2. What dramatic photos. I hope you're staying safe and dry.

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    1. We are fine sometimes it is an advantage to live 10 minutes walk away from the sea! Sarah x

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  3. YIKES! Poor people. I'll stop complaining about the -28 temps here - at least I'm warm and dry!

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  4. I have always envied anyone who lives by the sea, yet the recent events are proving otherwise. I hope you stay safe and warm Sarah! I still think you live in a beautiful part of the world. xx

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  5. Thanks for the welcome :-) As it happens we have been down to Portland - last week in fact - part of a road trip which I'm gradually putting on my blog. Is it okay if I mention your blog and to add a Link to this post when I get to the Portland part of our journey? .....ann :-)

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    1. Welcome - I am quite happy if you include a link. I did notice you had been in Dorset but didn't have time to comment as the food was almost ready, I'm off to visit you now! Sarah x

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    2. Thanks for that Sarah - we enjoyed our visit to Dorset...sort of visited twice..as stopped in Bournemouth and then briefly on the way back through on the way home too.....ann.

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  6. What were once most desirable seafront homes must now be a liability and uninsurable. Tragic for so many people and expensive for the whole country. We've not been too badly affected here though sea walls have been breached in many places. Your photographs are amazing!

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  7. Ooh my goodness! these pictures show the brutal truth.....My heart goes out to all those affected...I'm scared , so scared of water and the sea's...Keep safe, dear Sarah...We are water logged here in Cumbria...But this is terrifying..
    Hugs Maria x

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  8. It's a similar story here. The waves along Porthmeor were hug yesterday. And we visited Mousehole and Lamorna today. I couldn't believe the sight of Lamorna's harbour wall in ruins, with a huge piece of it in the car park. All along Penzance promenade are huge pebbles thrown up by the sea. There is an amazing picture of Botallack mine during this week's storms doing the rounds. I haven't ventured close but stayed high above the beach or looking out of my Father in Law's window.

    Leanne xx

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  9. Oh no...NO! Those waves have gotten much too close my friend, to what appear to be very old homes that have withstood decades of weather! We here have been having one of the coldest winters in 30 years. It is unbearable! XOXOX

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  10. Sarah, I have to say I have watched on tv what has been happening down your way and find it incredible. It would have been bad as a one off but its happening on a regular basis this winter isnt it? Hoping you arent too badly affected yourself.XX

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  11. I do worry about what is happening to the weather.. not just here, whether it is cold, hot, wet or dry all over the world the climate has changed. Dramatic pictures Sarah, I'm glad you did not get too close.

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  12. Dear Sarah, I hope this week will be a better one for the UK! The waves look huge.....and those poor people who live at the seafront....We had storm today as well, but I don't think it is as bad as on your photo's.

    Happy week & take care,

    Madelief x

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  13. What a waves, spectacular. I hope you are save and dry. Lovely greetings

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  14. Hello, Sarah... Up until last September I used to work in Alaska during the fishing seasons. The weather gets rough up there too (as those 'reality shows' show on TV), but never in my 16 seasons up there have I seen waves like that. Thank you.

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    1. That's amazing to hear, I would have imagined the seas would have been much wilder in Alaska! Sarah x

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  15. Amazing pictures of dear, battered Dorset. I can't believe the damage to the railway at Dawlish, only this time last year I was up and down to Plymouth, and that bit, and the Somerset Levels were the best parts of the journey. I feel so sad for all those poor folk who have lost their homes and livelihood. Maybe someone will listen now. We have local flooding here, and I can't believe how high the river and canal is in town. Fingers crossed the worst of the weather is over. Come on Spring, we're waiting!!! Glad you are safe and dry.

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  16. I thought of you both yesterday and today as we walked along the beach. Our beach at the end of our lane is too crowded on weekends for us to throw the ball to Lulu and let her get a good run in. We went to two different spots this weekend and they reminded me of your beaches. But, we are not getting the huge waves you showed.

    Crazy weather patterns across the world. We are in a major drought and got two days of welcome rain in our part of the coast. Northern California is being pelted with rain and snow which should help the water levels. Our water level is still way too low.

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  17. Dear Sarah - you must have felt mixed emotions when viewing those angry waves. I am sure watching them was both exciting and exhilarating, but then tinged with the great sadness for those who have suffered and continue to suffer from this awful weather.
    H could not get home from Paddington Station last week and wondered why. The station actually laid on a taxi for his journey back to the Cotswolds - it was only when we viewed the news that we realised why - the line in Dawlish being washed away prevented many trains getting back to London.

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  18. The floods look dreadful from what I've seen. I thought about your train ride when I saw the news about Dawlish this week. Here, we don't suffer from flooding at all - river levels rise, fields become waterlogged and some have large pools on them (but those fields are the ones that often have a pool, even in normal rainfall) so I've never experienced flooding and can't begin to imagine how awful it must be, especially those who are suffering this over and over. I hope you are safe and dry!

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  19. I know that you will stay safe and warm and dry, but please do look after yourself won't you. We are not having wave/tide troubles, but flooding river troubles here with our village becoming more cut off by the hour it seems. As long as our house stays dry we will be OK in the long run, but it is so horrid for those who do not live as high as we do. I feel so much for those who live on the coast or in Somerset, but it looks as though we could have neighbours heading that way too. Keep safe. xx

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  20. Those waves are scarily huge. I feel so for everyone affected by these storms, wherever they are. I grew up on the edge of the Somerset Levels and the devastation there is heart breaking. Let's hope the weather gives us all a break soon.

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    1. The situation on the Somerset Levels seems to worsen by the day I can't imagine how awful it must be all those families. Sarah x

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  21. Even our news told about the terrible storms and the damage to the railway. Weather conditions certainly seem to be out of the ordinary all around the world. By us this had meant an unusually mild winter: it's been raining today. We can only hope the extraordinary events will speed up the right kind of decisions at the highest level to save the planet.

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  22. Dearest Sarah, yes, it is a very long winter and will probably go into late May, as usual. But the consistent below zero days are wearing on everyone!

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  23. So sorry to see the devastation. Have they forecasted when they expect this violent weather will end? We are having an unusual amount of snow and extreme temperatures here on the East Coast of the US as well as in other parts of the country this year. Our ice storm this week knocked out power for several days for some people. Ours was out for 32 hours.

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  24. Oh Sarah this weather has been so wild, I feel so sad for those people that have lost their livelihoods and homes.at last they seem to be getting some help..lets hope
    Thea xx

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  25. Incredible weather and photos, Sarah! Although your storms have been mentioned on our news and in some of the blogs that I follow, I had not seen photos until yours and Matthew Gordon's particularly illustrative shot. I am so sorry for the destruction and those suffering because of it. Crackling clumps and thumps of ice and snow and branches have been falling from the huge cherry tree outside the window as the temperature rises here in Boring, Oregon. The forces of nature in the world are indeed powerful! Thanks for posting. xx

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  26. Oh how very terrifying it must have been for all living close to the sea, I hope it has all calmed down now.

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  27. The waves in those pictures are frightening. I can not believe how many storms you have had to suffer through this winter. The costs of repairing everything at the end of this winter is going to be enormous. Hopefully no lives were lost during this latest storm.

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  28. The sea is scary....as much as I love it, it is all powerful. I would not be able to live so near the seawater's edge. I do hope life is not lost. So thankful to hear that you are safe and a safe distance away. I know your heart goes out to all who are affected. And I would not even know, if it weren't for your blog. I will now be praying. xo

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  29. Wow, what incredible pictures! Stay safe.

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  30. wow, that looks pretty scary, I heard about the bad weather, but these pictures certainly put things into perspective- Hope all is well.

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  31. I have seen it in the television, but only one picture. It is horrible - and so bad for the poor people which lives at the seefront. I Hope, you are safe!

    Sigrun

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  32. Indeed January feels like a very volatile weather month more and more each year. Thankfully my loved ones near the bush fires are safe and unaffected this year. These pictures are incredible in telling the story and giving us an idea of the size of the waves & storms etc in your part of the world. Your second photo is incredible in showing that. Best wishes to all who are affected. x

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  33. Dramatic pictures Sarah, the power of the sea is both amazing and scary, glad your far enough away to stay safe. Sympathy goes out to all those who have had their homes damaged.
    Annie

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  34. These storms and floods have terrible for so many people across the country. The waves look amazing with such power, and the buildings look very vulnerable so close to them. I hope you keep safe.

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  35. The pictures are so dramatic, and how it changes to a calm sea as if no damage has been done; the sea and the weather are indeed unpredictable beasts! Those houses are so close to the sea I wonder if they will ever recover? Stay safe Sarah.

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  36. Fantastic shots there Sarah, and the one off the internet is amazing. x

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  37. Much as I love the seaside, I'm so glad that we live where we do, well away from it. We've had plenty of rain and wind here in Lancashire recently, but have escaped the really bad weather so far. Those massive waves look quite frightening.

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  38. Hello Sarah, Oh my goodness, how frightening the Sea would of been hitting your home like that. My heart goes out to all who had damage from the storm.. It is amazing to see the calm after such fiery even thought it looks like it is still very wild. I am glad you are OK.. Thanks for sharing your photos. I had heard about flooding but i had not seen any photos of the storms. Hugs Judy

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  39. These pictures are amazing, the power of the sea is quite remarkable. We have not had anything like the weather that you have had, thankfully. Keep safe xxx

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  40. Mother Nature is amazing in all her moods. So sad for those homes and business that have been flooded. I hope you remain dry and safe. Thank you for sharing your photos and the story. Best, Kim

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  41. The sea scenes here, are pretty much the same as ours. Along the sea fronts and villages that are built close to the sea. Heavy waves and very very high.
    The weather patterns are sure changing Sarah.
    Its been rain rain rain and heavy winds here. Not much to do.
    Inside staying warm.
    The somerset levels are really being hit hard. Its so so sad.
    some homes along the river Tejo have also been flooded.
    happy Tuesday and hope you stay safe at your home. val x

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  42. The picture are beautiful, it shows a great power, the sea power :)
    Love to visit your blog
    Nina

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  43. The sea looks really rough and the houses look like they were being about to get hit. The pictures are so powerful Sarah. Stay safe!

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  44. We'be been following it all on the news and feel so sorry for all those people whose houses have been flooded and who have been surrounded by water for so long. When is it going to end? Glad to know you're keeping dry and safe.

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  45. I wish we could send Australia some of our excess water !

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  46. Thanks for the photos and the waves look powerful in the photo. What a beautiful seaside city. We are doing wonderful here in Southern California. We have not had not much rain but I'm really enjoying the beautiful weather. I'm grateful for the lovely days here. Have a wonderful day Sarah. : )

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  47. Hi Sarah,

    What amazing power to see the sea like that and your photos are really awesome. I do feel for those people living in the houses near the sea shore, it must be so difficult. Yes, scorching hot temps over in Australia and with the storms over there, I just hope that the conditions will be better for all.
    Hope that you are enjoying the week
    Hugs
    Carolyn

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  48. These are such dramatic photos Sarah. I normally enjoy watching the surf come in on a blowy day but this is getting scary now. The Thames Valley are also having major problems with water - the river bursting its banks and much flooding everywhere. You wonder when its all going to stop. Thankfully we in Essex have not been too affected - yet, although the high winds are quite frightening. Keep safe.
    Patricia x

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  49. Hello Sarah, I have heard and seen such awful photo on the news of the flooding in the South of England... I do hope you are safe and My thoughts and prayers go out to everyone effected by these terrible floods. Hugs Judy

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    1. Hi Judy,Thanks for your thoughts and prayers it has been anothetr awfukl week of weather in the South of England. We are OK but so many others have been so badly affected. Sarah x

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  50. What fantastic pictures Sarah. Those first four are particularly stunning. Glad to be back and able to visit again! xx

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  51. Sarah, those are such powerful photographs and show the mixed beauty and horror of the winter seas this year.
    Have you seen the photos on the Bournemouth Daily Echo`s website after last night`s storm? Beach huts smashed to smithereens and such damage that no one has been allowed on Bournemouth sea front today, until some of the mess has been sorted out.

    So sad for so many people. What a winter this is turning out to be!

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    1. No I hadn't seen those pictures from Bournemouth so thank you for telling me about them. Mudeford and Christchurch have been so badly affected too. It's incredible the damage that has been caused. Sarah x

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  52. My thoughts are with all those affected by your weather and the flooding ~

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