Sunday, 10 August 2014

Overlooking Southampton Water

 First of all thank you for all the lovely comments you left with me during the last week. I was very touched and many bought more than a tear to my eye! Dear Daisy has had a reasonable week.

Back in May we headed to Southampton for the day, not to visit the shops or Ikea but to walk along the seashore at Royal Victoria Park and also to unexpectedly discover a part of history!


It was a beautiful day and the views were equally stunning and different from our part of Dorset.



 I was attracted by the roots of the tree, sadly neither of us noticed at the time whether the tree was still alive.


The winter storms have created this wild landscape (above).  It  almost matched the colours and shapes of this graffiti on a World War 2 bunker we discovered close by.




Many boats sailed past as we walked along the shore. The container ship was huge. I wouldn't have wanted to be in that tiny rowing boat! The oil refinery on the opposite bank created an unusual back drop.


After our walk by the water we headed towards this beautiful building amongst the trees. We discovered it was a hospital chapel, and all that remained of a huge military hospital that once stood on this site. Unfortunately the visitor centre inside was shut so I was unable to learn very much more about it until we returned home.

One of my favourite ladybird books was the story of Florence Nightingale (the founder of modern nursing.) She was a remarkable lady and realised that patients needed fresh air, light, nourishing food, peace and quiet to help them heal. She is still remembered on the anniversary of her birthday on 12th May each year when nurses celebrate International Nursing Day.

The horrendous conditions in the military hospitals in Crimea in 1854 resulted in the construction of a huge military hospital in England. This site was chosen because of it's close proximity to the sea - where wounded troops could be transported from the ships bringing them home. The hospital was a quarter of a mile long, had 138 wards and around 1,000 beds. The hospital was planned and built while Florence Nightingale was still nursing in the Crimea. When she returned she was unhappy with the way the building was designed, but it was too late to make many major changes. Her main criticism was the lack of windows in the wards and the lack of ventilation and fresh air. Queen Victoria made many visits here, she was very supportive of the project and it was only a short boat ride away from her home, Osbourne House, on the Isle of Wight.
The hospital was extensively used in the First and Second World Wars. In the first World War the hospital expanded to accommodate 2,500 patients. It was finally closed in 1958. See here for more details and pictures of the hospital and park.


On a sunny day it was lovely to see so many families out together enjoying the extensive grounds having picnics and playing games of football and cricket, such a different scene to a century ago!



Sarah x

34 comments:

  1. What a lovely post, and such an interesting place to visit. I loved the ladybird books when I was little. Brilliant photos, especially the container ship - it's a terrifying sight. The hidden cost of having so much imported stuff I guess. I hope you have a good week. CJ xx

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sarah, you are a gifted photographer, and I appreciate your narrative as well! I can remember reading a biography of Florence Nightingale when I was a child, and being so impressed with her life, so it is especially interesting to see a site that she cared about. Thanks so much for posting! xx

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have never visited this chapel, but I saw something about it on TV recently - not sure of the show I am afraid - but it was very interesting to hear about. I am glad that you enjoyed your visit. xx

    ReplyDelete
  4. Southampton looks lovely on a sunny day. Glad to hear Daisy has had an 'ok' sort of week.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks for the history lesson and the beautiful pictures. One of my favorite parts of blogging is seeing other parts of the world, through it's residents.

    ReplyDelete
  6. What an interesting place to visit. A good thing maybe that the formidable old hospital buildings have given way to a seaside park. I`m glad that there are still memorials for the many, many injured servicemen who were treated there, and the for many who died there.

    I had that Ladybird book of Florence Nightingale. I can see the illustrations now in my minds eye!

    ReplyDelete
  7. This has brought back a few memories of walks there years ago. Think I even have a painting I did back then of the shoreline. Talking of Florence Nightingale, I had an Aunt who as a child met her, in fact FN gave her a ride in her horse and cart out at Wellow near Romsey.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Glad Daisy has had a more reasonable week. Hugs to you both...

    Gorgeous photos- looks such an interesting place!x

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thank you for the tour, what a lovely place! (the history, not so lovely...)

    Have a wonderful week!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Good morning Sarah, and thanks for all the wonderful fotos. I like always your fotos from the see, and the report about Florence N. and the Hospital is very interesting.

    Sigrun

    ReplyDelete
  11. When I saw the first picture I thought you were going to say that they were sailing yesterday! Lovely pictures, great tour of Southampton thank you x

    ReplyDelete
  12. All the lanes in our little beach area are named after British areas - Cornwall, Weymouth, Bath, Dover, etc. Originally the houses faced sidewalks that were called "Courts" and the address of our house was Southampton Court. The sidewalks were closed off so the only access is the lanes. Ours is New Brunswick Lane.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Dear Sarah, I was away last week so I missed your post about dear Daisy. Just wanted to let you know I am thinking of her and of you and am sending her lots of love. You know I know how you are feeling. Love, CT x

    ReplyDelete
  14. Another lovely place you have taken us to. Look like you had a great day out.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thank you for showing us something of Southampton. I was there as an "au pair", a very long time ago, 45 years. It brings back memories of the views over the Solent.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Dear dear Sarah,

    First of all, I totally forgot to mention something in my last comment about DAISY...I am sickened to learn about her condition. My friend, how are you holding up? I see from here that you are enjoying the beauty and history of your area, which I would love to see one day. Sea air, lush landscape and so much architectural interest would make this a dream site to spend time.

    But my heart aches to learn of Daisy. Please keep us posted. Stay well. Anita

    ReplyDelete
  17. A very interesting post Sarah.
    The weather looks amazing for May.
    What a beautiful beach. So clean and bright.
    England, has such beautiful places to visit.
    Florence Nightingale was ahead of her time. She revolutionized nursing, a great woman.
    I enjoyed reading your write up about her.
    I remember seeing a film once. It was about children with TB- they were sent to the coast. Could have been there in the early 30's I think.. I was wondering if this was also one of Florence's treatments.. they slept outside through all kinds of weather. It was said that it could cure the TB.
    To think, how far medicine has advanced.. Just a course of antibiotics and TB is gone.
    Happy Monday Sarah.
    Val xxx

    ReplyDelete
  18. Florence Nightingale criticising the lack of fresh air in the hospital reminds me of how many hospitals years ago used to pushed the beds out of the wards on to large verandahs so that patients could take the air. I wonder why it was decided that it was no longer the thing to do and whether or not it did help in their recovery? I suppose it is rather like the change of habit when babies used to be left out in the garden all day sleeping in their prams - if it rained the hood and apron were put on to keep them dry. I even recall seeing babies looking over the top of their pram aprons with cold little cherry red noses.

    ReplyDelete
  19. What an interesting day out! I love discovering new bits of history that I previously knew nothing about. The story of the hospital is fascinating. It's also rather sad when you think of all the young men who were treated there over the years, the horrors they experienced, and for many of them how their lives would never be the same again. I'm happy to hear Daisy has had a good week.

    ReplyDelete
  20. To me the name "Netley Hospital" means the psychiatric hospital. I didn't know that there had been a "normal" hospital there too. It looks like a good place to have a hospital though - plenty of sea air to promote convalescence. There are some brilliant photos in your post today; thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  21. A beautiful set of photos Sarah, you have a great eye for capturing perfect shots. Love the colours of the sails contrasting with the refinery in particular and the tree with the heart carved out is very unusual.

    ReplyDelete
  22. You do have a good eye Sarah! (Grafitti and grasses....) Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Wow! That container ship is massive! We get them like that coming to the docks at Liverpool. Southampton looks like a really good place to see plenty of history.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Beautiful photos! So sorry to hear the sad news about Daisy. Thinking of you, Pj x

    ReplyDelete
  25. Such beautiful, crystal clear colours in your photos. Graffiti can be beautiful sometimes, in my opinion!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Dear Sarah,

    Happy to hear Daisy is stable. Hope she will stay like that for a long time! Beautiful photo's of the Dorset coast. I especially like the tree!

    Enjoy the rest of the week!

    Madelief x

    ReplyDelete
  27. Hi Sarah, looks like a wonderful day out! I should definitely go to Southampton since it's my birth city and I spent many years there, yet I seldom see the views you have on your lovely day out. So glad little Daisy managing week by week. Hope you have a lovely week Sarah. Sharon x

    ReplyDelete
  28. Looks like a varied and interesting day out indeed! That tree is truly stunning, those roots!! I need a trip to Southampton soon, it's been a long time and usually just for -obvious- shopping needs, so thank you for the inspiration!

    ReplyDelete
  29. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  30. I missed your Daisy post too. So sorry! Lovely pics here Sarah - I like the graffiti one best. xx

    ReplyDelete
  31. I know this area very well as I used to work in Hamble, just down the coast from Netley, before I came up to London. I long time ago now but I remember it well. Between your posts about Weymouth and Southampton, you're making me feel quite nostalgic! Fawley Refinery across the water is a bit of a blot on the landscape - I can even see it from the seafront in Alverstoke (Gosport)! I'm glad that Daisy has had a comfortable week, it's a terrible time for you all as a family. Caro x

    ReplyDelete
  32. Dear Sarah,

    I was so sorry to hear about your Daisy. It hurts so bad when the ones we love are ill. Sending you big hugs.♥

    Thank you so very much for bringing us along to Southampton. It sounds like you had a fantastic day and your pictures are absolutely fantastic. And I loved the bit about Florence Nightingale and the hospital.

    Take care sweet Sarah!

    Charlie
    xx

    ReplyDelete
  33. Just catching up here, and I'm so sorry to read that Daisy is unwell. I am looking at my own pack and remembering those we've lost down the years and hoping that the path ahead will be as easy as is possible for all of you x

    ReplyDelete
  34. So sorry to hear about your little Daisy - I hope things become easier for you all. I grew up a couple of miles from Victoria Park in Southampton (I moved away when I was 21) and went there regularly; my parents still live there. Your photos are stunning, and it's lovely to read about a place I know so well x

    ReplyDelete

Comments are the best thing about blogging so please join in and brighten my day!

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...