Wednesday, 12 June 2013

Queen Anne's Lace

Queen Anne’s (or Ann’s) lace is an alternative name for cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris) in the British Isles, and the common name of wild carrot (Daucus carota) in North America and is one of my favourite wildflowers that flowers from April to June. So I apologise in advance for sharing my passion of this beautiful weed before it disappears for another year.



Queen Anne, Queen Anne, has washed her lace
(She chose a summer's day)
And hung it in a grassy place
To whiten, if it may.




                                           
                                                Queen Anne, Queen Anne, has left it there, 

And slept the dewy night; 
Then waked, to find the sunshine fair, 
And all the meadows white.








 There seems to be various stories why these two plants are called Queen Anne's lace, some say it is because it has been named after Queen Anne (1574 to 1619) who was married to James I and was an expert lace maker. She challenged her ladies in waiting to produce a piece of lace as beautiful as the flower. Other stories say the flower reminded people of Queen Anne's lace head dress. Both these stories conjure up such lovely images.

Old Granary building supported by staddle stones surrounded by Queen's Anne lace.


The sun has disappeared the last few days and we are back to rain, let's hope we will see some more of summer again soon!
Sarah x


48 comments:

  1. Sarah this was a fabulous post. I loved all the pictures but especially the one with the blue door. I love cow parsley too but had never heard it called Queen Anne's Lace before. I always think the banks and verges look so pretty with it and then the council goes and cuts it all :-( Lovely to see sunny photos to- where has it all gone?! X

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  2. I love that!

    I always thought Cow Parsley was also called Jack By The Hedge.

    Lovely flowery pictures.

    Leanne xx

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  3. Too, too beautiful - you are a wonderful photographer.
    When I was a little girl (still am) I would put a stem of the lace into an ink bottle or a red food color bottle.
    It was my first lesson in osmosis.
    Keep your photos coming!

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  4. Dear Sarah,

    Lovely to see your beautiful photos with the Queen Anne's lace and the gorgeous countryside.
    The blue sky day and the pretty white flowers make a wonderful show. Love the old stone granary and the blue colour of the door.
    Thank you for sending the book and will let you know when it arrives.

    Have a happy week
    hugs
    Carolyn

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  5. OH Sarah such beautiful photos. I love cow parsley its one of my favourites x

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  6. Thank you for this lovely post about Queen Anne's lace. I did not know it is Wild Carrot on this side of the Atlantic. Whatever it's name, it is a pretty flower and your photos are little works of art; I can imagine a couple of them as paintings.

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  7. Hello Sarah, I LOVE Queen Anne Lace too.. The very OLD lovely building are so grand looking.. Loved seeing them... DID you know Queen Anne Lace was Anne of Green Gable's Favorite Wildflower? It is mentioned in the move several times.. I always enjoy a visit to your blog. Hugs Judy

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    1. I had forgotten that it was Anne of Green Gables favourite wild flower. The book was one of my favourites I must look at for a copy at the library and re read it!
      Sarah x

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  8. What an appropriate name for these little white clusters of wild flowers. I enjoy listening to your stories and tales -- they are like a cultural lesson for me :)

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  9. Wonderful photos! I also love cow parsley and its second common name. Ours would translate something like 'dog's pipe'. Very far from Queen Anne's lace.

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    1. It certainly doesn't sound so appealing in Finnish!
      Sarah x

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  10. Sweet Sarah,

    This is a very dear post, close to my heart. It is in the silence of the flowers that I hear peace and love....a special grace that is found in the intricate patterns of such miracles. Thank you for this moment of silent beauty! Anita

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  11. such beautiful photos and countryside! a gorgeous flower.
    x

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  12. It is one of my favourites too... loving those saddle stones too! Cx

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  13. It is everywhere down here in Devon at the moment and I love it too..
    We certainly need to have the sunshine back. I fear it may be my fault for swopping over to a more summery wardrobe last week. Well the fleeces are back out now!!

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  14. It is beautiful and one of my favorite "weeds" too.

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  15. Such a beautiful post about one of my favourite wild flowers. The poem is new to me, so thank you.

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  16. Oh Sarah
    Tis a post to behold, I love Queen Ann's lace...
    It has been so beautiful this year in the lanes..one of my all time favourite's too
    happy shiny week
    Thea x

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  17. There is nothing more lovely than cow parsley in the hedgerows, and this year it's clouds of white lace have been spectacular. Lovely photos especially the one with the black background - stunning. I tend to call it cow parsley even though queen anne's lace is a much prettier name mainly because that was what I knew it as when a child.

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  18. What a gorgeous little poem! I'd never heard it before!

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  19. lovely story! and such beautiful photos too.

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  20. How interesting. I agree with Rosemary, Queen Anne's Lace is a prettier name for this lovely wild flower of which there's a lot round here.

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  21. It is one of my favourites too. Juliex

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  22. I love cow parsley I had never heard it called Queen Ann's lace such a pretty and appropriate name ... lovely x

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  23. We also have this wildflower here but I didn't know its names, so interesting.And this poem ,usually it's difficult for me to understand poetry in English, but this little verse was very clear!Thank you Sarah!

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  24. Hi Sarah, I'm a new follower of yours and I love Queen Anne's lace, it's so delicate! Love your blog and your pics! Have a lovely week. Sharon

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  25. I love it also, I have tried to grow it in my garden, but with on luck.

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  26. Beautiful! Your first picture looks so fairytale like. Beautiful!
    Marian

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  27. Lovely photos. I love to see the hedgerows and country lanes full of cow parsley. And it really frames those wonderful old buildings. I was fascinated by the story and association with Queen Anne, too.

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  28. I've never heard this little poem, fantastic photos! :) x

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  29. I love cow parsley. The first photo is super.
    June

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  30. I love this anthriscus and its story is quite interesting too. You posted some very charming pictures. Here where I live we only have daucus but it's not as elegant as anthriscus. There is also a purple leaved anthriscus but I was never able to put my hands on it.
    Alberto

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  31. Sara, what beautiful views of Queen Anns' Lace. I very much enjoyed the story too !

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  32. Fascinating story.I love the cow parsley too and did you know you can grow a purple variety which is less invasive in your garden?

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    1. Yes I know the purple variety called Ravens wing and I love it unfortunately the slugs and snails seem to admire it too! We have bought it about 4 times but sadly I have now given up trying!
      Sarah x

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  33. I love the cow parsley too - I can't get enough of it, the lanes looks wonderful all lined with it. Thank for your recent comments - I won't be moving when I start teaching, no, Dave and I are living with my parents as we can't afford our own home. We are trying to save. I will have to travel quite a bit further though but I live in hope that I can find a job closer to home at the end of the course.

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  34. I love the cow parsley photos, especially the one with the dark background. It's a beautiful plant and stands almost upright in the wind and rain on the costal path here.

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  35. Very interesting story on the naming of Queen Anne's Lace. Beautiful photos! X

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  36. Thank you so much for visiting me today, have a wonderful weekend! xox

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  37. Hi Sarah,
    Beautiful photos. I tried to grow some one year. I did get a few. Them growing wild, how lovely.
    Blessings,
    Bobbie Lynn

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  38. I want to jump the gate in the last photo and go for a run up that track! How inviting. x

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  39. I love your stories about queen anne's lance, fluitenkruid in holland. The english name is much better! Nice picture, lovely greetings

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  40. ~ Oooh I simply must pick this wonderful wild flower and bring home, when I see it...It seems to epitomise, summer in a vase, to me...Lovely photographs as always, Sarah! wishing you more summer days and balmy evenings to come...Love Maria x

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  41. I have never seen a house on those before! I love the poem too. We have returned from our family holiday in Lyme Regis and had a great time finding fossils and making sandcastles. Jo x

    http://joeveryday19.blogspot.co.uk/

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  42. For years I tried to get rid of this from a bank under ash trees in my garden, but now I just let it grow. I honestly hadn't heard of any other common name for it than cow parsley (which sounds like a weed). Now I can call it Queen Anne's Lace it sounds far more cultivated!
    A lovely post, as usual :)

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  43. Hello, I've just found your lovely blog and am now a follower. Look forward to seeing more of your lovely photos.
    Julie :o)

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  44. Such a beautiful photo of that rural gateway drew me in... a breath of tranquil country air, an antidote to London.. Thank you !

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    1. I'm glad this gave you a feel of the countryside. Sarah x

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